The iPad will Change Education Forever

Ever since MIT’s famous OpenCourseWare initiative was launched in 2001, people have been fascinated with the power that technology would have on open sourcing of information and the democratization of education. OpenCourseWare started as MIT’s decision to open up its vast academic curricula to “any joker with a browser”. I will never forget the visualization […]

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Mobile – It’s not a U.S. Centric World

  Google has a cool feature called Google Trends which allows you to look at the frequency of searches (top of the chart above) and news references (bottom portion) which occur globally. The chart above shows how often, ‘microsoft’, ‘apple’, and ‘nokia’ were searched from 2004 to present. The results are pretty interesting. Nokia is […]

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TED Joins the Online Video War

As the battle for HTML-5 vs Flash plays out something interesting is happening in online video. Sites are proactively converting videos to H.264 for use on mobile devices. Today, Chris Anderson of the much lauded (or hated if you weren’t invited) TED.com sent this Tweet showingthat videos are now available in H.264 for the iPhone. […]

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Nokia’s Strategy: Dumber Phones, Smarter Websites

Yesterday Nokia acquired Novarra, a company that makes browser technology for low-end mobile phones. While Nokia’s exact strategy is unknown, they said Novarra will be used to deliver new services to mainstream Series 40 devices later this year. Series 40 is what powered old-school candy bar Nokia phones that everyone in the US used earlier […]

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The Math and Psychology Behind Group Buying

Josh Kopelman, a partner at First Round Capital, recently wrote a post entitled Change is coming to online shopping in which he argued that disruption is finally poised to return to e-commerce after a decade of relative stagnation (Josh knows retail—he sold half.com to Ebay during web 1.0). His thesis: Real time marketing and targeting […]

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Backward Compatibility vs Innovation – Why Apple Leads

In the tech world, there is a reoccurring question that gets debated in marketing, design, and engineering departments—backwards compatibility. It goes like this: a company has existing customers / users of its products, and wants / needs to factor these in when making a new revision of an existing platform or product. Take the example […]

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The Velocity of Ideas and the Information Economy

Content tends to take on a power law distribution = “long tail”. As more people rely on social graphs for link sharing and discovery, and as the velocity of information they are sharing increases, a lot of good content is drowned out by the ‘top’ content – in terms of the 80/20 rule which governs […]

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Convergence – AT&T’s and Cisco’s Strategy

The below device is called a femtocell / microcell. Femtocells are really the first real-life incarnation of what’s known as “fixed / mobile convergence”, so they deserve some attention in that context. AT&T’s microcell is designed by Cisco. This is another consumer end market Cisco is pushing into, and indicative of why they need you […]

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The Background Behind Cisco’s Chest Pounding

Over the past few weeks, the blogosphere hype machine has been in a tizzy, counting down to March 9th when Cisco would “forever change the internet“. Today folks were “disappointed”—turns out Cisco didn’t really change anything (all they did was release a new core router—their bread and butter business). As background, consumers DO NOT CARE […]

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Why Wireless Doesn’t Scale with Moore’s Law

Moore’s Law, which simply states that the capability/cost curve of chips should double every 18 months, hasn’t applied to mobile operators. Below are some reasons why the cost structure and performance/capabilities of wireless proves way more complex than silicon: Scarcity of wireless spectrum: Wireless spectrum allocation costs prescribe to a different cost/capability curve, one based […]

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