Convergence – AT&T’s and Cisco’s Strategy

The below device is called a femtocell / microcell. Femtocells are really the first real-life incarnation of what’s known as “fixed / mobile convergence”, so they deserve some attention in that context. AT&T’s microcell is designed by Cisco. This is another consumer end market Cisco is pushing into, and indicative of why they need you […]

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Why Wireless Doesn’t Scale with Moore’s Law

Moore’s Law, which simply states that the capability/cost curve of chips should double every 18 months, hasn’t applied to mobile operators. Below are some reasons why the cost structure and performance/capabilities of wireless proves way more complex than silicon: Scarcity of wireless spectrum: Wireless spectrum allocation costs prescribe to a different cost/capability curve, one based […]

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Why Your Cell Service REALLY Sucks

The above chart is a great depiction of why your wireless experience really sucks. Here are some stats: Mobile traffic is currently doubling every 9 months New capacity growth is only about 20% per year 3% of users represent about 40% of data usage The operators (AT&T, Verizon, Sprint…) entered a completely new usage paradigm […]

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Microsoft Windows Mobile – Open Source or Bust!

Microsoft’s announcement yesterday that they will charge for Windows Mobile 7 licenses was jaw-dropping bizarre given how bad the company has flailed in the mobile space. Silicon alley insider did a nice piece today showing that mobile OS revenue contribution will likely be about 0.5% of revenues in 2011. If Microsoft looks around they will […]

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Twenty Seven Companies Unite to Kill Apple (Huh?)

Today there was relatively huge news out of Mobile World Congress in Barcelona that 27 companies are uniting to offer an online app store experience to rival Apple’s. Yes 27. Among the global alliance, 24 of 27 are wireless operators (Orange, Vodafone, AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, etc) with access to 3B customers worldwide. Samsung, Sony Ericsson, […]

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Why Google Broadband Finally Makes Sense

  Yesterday Google declared it was getting in to the broadband market. As Chris Dixon pointed out, this was about the fourth time. What’s different this time and are they really going to do it? I don’t think the timing of their announcement is coincidental. Recently there have been significant developments with respect to the […]

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The Ultimate Killer App – Mobility

Since the web began people have been talking about the next “killer app”. This refers to new / innovative user experiences (usually which didn’t exist in the non-web world). For example, Skype video calling has been referred to as a killer app. A lot of killer apps suffer when the user is stationary or tied […]

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Why Intel is Sinking in Mobile (w/ Microsoft)

A lot is made of Microsoft’s failures in the mobile market (and for good reason). Equally interesting – but discussed much less – is how the mobile computing revolution is disrupting Intel. I previously discussed how processing chips designed for mobile and PCs are converging. This can be proven simply by looking at Apple’s new […]

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Education Meets Mobile

I love teaching and coaching, and occasionally I teach the GMAT to prospective b-schoolers. Recently I went into the iTunes app store to check whether any GMAT specific apps existed. Here’s what I found: About 30 GMAT apps – most sketchy. A few free, most sub $5, one for $20 Only reputable company is Veritas. […]

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Google Android’s Failings

I absolutely love Google, but for the reasons I outlined here, Android is going to have tremendous trouble in replicating the success that Windows / PCs experienced in the 1980s and 90s. People like to blindly claim that because Android is “open”, it’s certain to follow in the footsteps of Windows & PCs, upending Apple’s […]

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